Monthly Archives November 2013

KILLER WAR DRONES EX-PILOT SPILLS THE BEANS ON KILLS HE MADE

An unmanned US Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field in Afghanistan in 2010.

WAR DRONE IN AFGANISTAN image www.spy-drones.com

A former US Air Force drone operator has described how he is haunted by his time as a ”remote killer” functioning in ”zombie mode” in missions over Afghanistan and Iraq that claimed more than 1600 lives.

Brandon Bryant, a retired airman who operated remote-controlled Predator aircraft from US bases in Nevada and New Mexico, offered a rare military insider’s perspective on the US drone program in GQ magazine.

He described monitoring a drone strike on a mud compound in Afghanistan and seeing the figure of what he was certain was a child just before it was struck by a Hellfire missile.

When he expressed those concerns to an intelligence observer overseeing the operation, the response came back: ”Per the revie...

Read More

LASER BEAMS NOW IN DRONES EMULATE THE STAR WARS ERA

Dr. Evil would be proud.

Lasers have always been the next frontier (some would say pipe dream) of weapons development — also, real lasers don’t look anything like they do in Star Wars. But recent developments have brought Sci-Fi closer to reality. And now this — the Pentagon has awarded a total of $26 million to defense contractors to develop a laser countermeasures system for manned and unmanned aircraft.

Laser beams & sharks video>>

DARPA’s Project Endurance is an outgrowth of the Excalibur program, which aims to develop “coherent optical phased array technologies to enable scalable laser weapons that are 10 times lighter and more compact than existing high-power chemical laser systems.” Laser countermeasures systems are nothing new — the Navy plans to deploy a shipboard l...

Read More

BAT WINGS TOUTED AS THE ULTIMATE IN PROPELLING FLYING ROBOTIC DRONES VIDEO HERE EXPLAINS

BAT WINGS CAN BE THE ULTIMATE ROBOTIC FLYING DRONE PROPULSION

Robat120130226090006

A new 3D printed robotic bat wing can emulate the flapping motion of a real bat, helping biologists simulate how the mammals fly and helping aerodynamics researchers study new flapping-wing aircraft. In the process of building and modifying the robotic wing, researchers at Brown University stumbled upon some structural fixes that provide insight into how bat bodies evolved for flight.

Bat wings are incredibly complex mechanisms, producing lift and thrust to help the flying mammals quickly chase their insect prey, fly long distances, and nimbly move through dense clouds of their compatriots...

Read More

ROBOT THAT JUMPS, SWIMS,WALKS, FLIES,DRIVES, WHAT NEXT IN THIS CONCEPTUAL VIDEO

COULD THIS BE THE FORERUNNER TO THE ULTIMATE ROBOTIC DRONE

Video here shows a conceptual design created by Sandia National Laboratories for their “Multi-Modal Vehicle Concept,” which is a single unmanned system capable of flying, swimming, driving, and hopping across a variety of terrains and obstacles. Sandia’s Intelligent Systems, Robotics, & Cybernetics (ISRC) department has built and conducted limited testing on conceptual hardware. According to researchers, testing has shown that the concept could soon be a reality. Watch video here >>

AAA

Henry Sapiecha

Read More

HOW TO BEST CONTROL REMOTE ROBOTIC CONTROL DEVICES SHOWS HERE

HOW TO SIMPLIFY REMOTE ROBOTIC CONTROL DEVICES & MAKE THEM FASTER

By integrating video technology and familiar control devices, a research team from Georgia Tech and the Georgia Tech Research Institute is developing a technique to simplify remote control of robotic devices. The researchers’ aim is to enhance a human operator’s ability to perform precise tasks using a multi-jointed robotic device such as an articulated mechanical arm. Known as Uncalibrated Visual Servoing for Intuitive Human Guidance of Robots, the new method uses a special implementation of an existing vision-guided control method called visual servoing (VS)...

Read More

SWARM OF ROBO DRONE BEES MAP OUT 3D IMAGE OF A SWISS MOUNTAIN

THOUSANDS OF IMAGES CREATED BY ROBOTIC BEE SWARM TO GIVE 3D IMAGE

A spin-off company of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), called senseFly, develops and assembles autonomous mini-drones and related software solutions. The company’s eBee drone has a flight time of up to 45 minutes, allowing it to cover areas of up to almost four square miles in a single flight. With its small 16-MP camera it can shoot high-resolution aerial imagery. CEO Jean-Christophe Zufferey describes how the company recently launched three lightweight eBee drones around the beautiful Matterhorn mountain, in the Swiss Alps. Over six hours and multiple flights, the mini-drones took almost 3,000 images...

Read More

IMPRESSIVE AEROBATICS DONE BY FLAPPING WINGS ROBOTIC BIRD DRONE SHOWN HERE IN VIDEO

ARE WE DUPLICATING REAL FLYING BIRDS WITH NEW ‘FLAP’ TECHNOLOGY

University of Maryland professors S. K. Gupta and Hugh Bruck have created a robotic bird named Robo Raven, whose wings flap completely independently of each other and can be programmed to perform any desired motion – enabling it to perform aerobatic maneuvers. This is the first time a robotic bird with these capabilities has been built and successfully flown. Gupta and Bruck first successfully demonstrated a flapping-wing bird in 2007. This robot used one motor to flap both wings together in simple motions. By 2010 the design had evolved over four successive models, but the limitation of simultaneous wing flapping restricted how well it could fly...

Read More

PRINTABLE ROBOTIC DRONES COULD BE MASS PRODUCED TO AID THE MASSES SHOWS HOW HERE IN VIDEO

ROBOTIC DRONES BEING PRINTED TO ALLOW MASS PRODUCTION

A project funded by the National Science Foundation’s Expeditions in Computing Program envisions a future in which 3D robotic systems can be produced and designed using 2D desktop technology fabrication methods. MIT Professor Daniela Rus is the project leader, and also the director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) – the largest interdepartmental laboratory at MIT and one of the world’s most important centers of computer science and information technology research. “This research envisions a whole new way of thinking about the design and manufacturing of robots, and could have a profound impact on society,” says Rus...

Read More

HOW A ROBOTIC APE DRONE CAN USE ALL FOURS THEN STAND ON ITS OWN TWO FEET SHOWS HERE

ROBOTIC APE GOES THROUGH ITS PACES FROM ALL FOURS TO STANDING UP

Researchers from the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) and the University of Bremen have developed the IStruct Demonstrator, a four-legged, ape-like robot capable of walking on four legs and standing upright. Most multi-legged robots are equipped with single-point-contact feet for the sake of simplicity in design and control. This battery-powered robo-ape has actuated multi-point-contact feet with multiple sensors and a flexible, actuated spinal column.

Watch video here>>

AA

Henry Sapiecha

Read More

HUMAN LIKE MULTICONTACT ROBOTIC DRONES SHOWS OFF ITS PACES IN VIDEO

VIDEO OF A MULTI CONTACT HUMAN LIKE WALKING ROBOTIC DRONE

The AMBER Lab in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Texas A&M University focuses on both theoretical and experimental research in bipedal robotics, locomotion, nonlinear and hybrid systems, and prosthetic design. AMBER Lab researchers recently demonstrated the human-like, multi-contact locomotion on their bipedal robot AMBER2. The robot has achieved sustainable walking with heel-life and toe-strike behaviors via torque control. Three different types of actuation are exhibited throughout the walking gait – full actuation, underactuation, and over-actuation.

Watch video here>

AAA

Henry Sapiecha

Read More

ALMOST BULLET PROOF FLYING ROBOTIC DRONES INSPIRED BY INSECTS IN THIS VIDEO

THE GIZMO GADGET FLYING DRONE THAT IS GIMBALL SHOWS OFF ITS PACES

Gimball is a spherical flying robot developed at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) that buzzes around the most unpredictable, chaotic environments – all without the need for fragile detection sensors. This resilience to injury was inspired by insects. Gimball is protected by a spherical, elastic cage which enables it to absorb and rebound from shocks. It keeps its balance using a gyroscopic stabilization system consisting of a double carbon-fiber ring that keeps the robot oriented vertically, while the cage absorbs shocks as it rotates. It is powered by twin propellers and steered by fins...

Read More