Monthly Archives June 2014

DRONES BEING FOUND FALLING FROM THE SKY IN THE DOZENS ON A REGULAR BASIS. VIDEO SHOWS

These days, things that seem to be falling from the sky could be real: Most likely drones or even Wi-Fi balloons.

Crashed unmanned drone is seen on Baengnyeong

This week was capped by a report from New Zealand that a Google Wi-Fi balloon had tumbled into the ocean, prompting a mistaken rescue attempt.

Earlier in the week, The Washington Post reported: “More than 400 large US military drones have crashed in major accidents around the world since 2001, a record of calamity that exposes the potential dangers of throwing open American skies to drone traffic.”

The Post obtained 50,000 pages of drone accident reports via the US Freedom of Information Act.

So far, no one has died in a drone accident, including a mid-air collision with a US Air Force transport. But crashing drones have narrowly missed people on the ground.

Air Force jets...

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MORE DETAILED CLOSEUPS OF US HERE ON PLANET EARTH FROM SPACE NOW THAT MANY RESTRICTIONS HAVE BEEN LIFTED

Lifting restrictions on satellite images means

even more detailed close-ups from space

You’ve got mail. We know because we can see your letterbox from space.

VIEW OF NEIGHBOURHOOD FROM SPACE CAMERA IMAGE www.spy-drones.com

In a major shake-up for satellite imagery, the US government has lifted restrictions on the level of detail that commercial satellites can capture, sell and publish.

Previously, features smaller than 50cm had to be pixelated or not used at all. The removal of that caveat means images showing close-up detail of streets, homes and persons can be publicly traded.

The high-resolution images have myriad commercial applications encompassing mining and oil, disaster management, economics and urban planning.

It may also mean more close-ups on consumer mapping services such as Google Maps and Bing Maps which currently rely on aerial photograp...

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JAPAN HAS ROBOT THAT FEELS EMOTIONS IT IS CLAIMED

Robot with emotions revealed in japan

JAPANESE EMOTIONAL ROBOT IMAGE www.spy-drones.com

Softbank’s Masayoshi Son with emotion-deciphering robot Pepper.

A cooing, gesturing humanoid on wheels that can decipher emotions has been unveiled in Japan by billionaire Masayoshi Son who says robots should be tender and make people smile.

Son’s mobile phone company Softbank said that the robot it has dubbed Pepper will go on sale in Japan in February for 198,000 yen. Overseas sales plans are under consideration but undecided.

The machine, which has no legs, but has gently gesticulating hands appeared on a stage in a Tokyo suburb, cooing and humming. It dramatically touched hands with Son in a Genesis or ET moment.

Son, who told the crowd that his longtime dream was to go into the personal robot business, said Pepper has been programmed to read th...

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AMAZON DOOR TO DOOR DELIVERIES USING DRONES

AMAZON & DRONE DELIVERED  PRODUCTS

AMAZON CEO IMAGE www.spy-drones.com

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has his sight on drone deliveries. 

In the quest to build drones that can help companies like Amazon.com make door-to-door deliveries, engineers are racing to overcome a fundamental challenge: helping unmanned, suitcase-sized aircraft see where they’re going.

The answer is developing sensors that are smart enough to keep the drones from smacking into buildings, people and anything else that would impede travel – yet small and light enough that the machines can stay aloft.

Start-ups around the US, eager for a slice of a market projected by Teal Group to more than double to $US11.6 billion ($12.4 billion) by 2023, are responding...

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