underwater drones in use tagged posts

How Scientific Sea Drones Are Becoming the Eyes of the Navy

From hunting and hiding submarines to planning SEAL missions, a fleet of 65 aquatic, submersible drones is already giving the U.S. Navy a tactical advantage.

sea-drones underwater image www.spy-drones.com

Last fall Rutgers University ocean researcher Oscar Schofield headed a collaborative experiment called Gliderpalooza, which coordinated 15 aquatic, submersible research drones to sample the deep waters off the coastal Atlantic. About 5 feet long and shaped like tomahawk missiles, the gliders beam home their data every time they surface. The propellerless drones, jam-packed with scientific instruments, swim by changing their buoyancy—taking on and expelling a soda can’s worth of water to sink and float. And they navigate under the waves by themselves...

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UNMANNED SUBMARINE DRONES TO MOVE LIKE STINGRAYS

FUTURE SUBMARINES TO BE UNMANNED AND TO SWIM LIKE STINGRAYS

Richard Bottom, left, and Iman Borazjani hope their research on how stingrays swim will lead to the design of new underwater vehicles image www.spy-drones.com

Richard Bottom, left, and Iman Borazjani hope their research on how stingrays swim will lead to the design of new underwater vehicles. Photo: Douglas Levre

This post was originally published on Mashable.

The next step in nature-inspired engineering could come in the form of small, stingray-like unmanned submarines.

Researchers at Harvard University and the University of Buffalo have studied how the sea creatures swim and believe their movements could be built into future underwater vehicles to make them more efficient.

The research may be especially applicable to small, driverless submarines that could perform water clean-up or rescue missions, Iman Borazjani, an engineering professor at the University of Buffalo, said.

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